Tagged: IPR

Getting the Most Out of Hashtags

By: Armani Shumpert

Hashtags are important for success in supporting social media content. Appearing as a keyword or phrase with no spaces with the # (pound) symbol at the front of it, the hashtag is a way to make material easy to find, at least when used correctly.

Hashtags have been widely used on Twitter, but they are now popular on other social media platforms sites such as Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn, and Pinterest. Understanding the difference in these platforms and how to use hashtags effectively is a great way for you to maximize your engagement with your followers.

The Basics

While a hashtag seems easy to place before keywords, some other specifics are important to note as you try to reap the greatest benefits of using hashtags. Here are some tips for general purposes:

  • Keep hashtags brief and unforgettable rather than attempting to include a variety of words with one tag.
  • Try not to pressure any post with hashtags. Use them only if they add importance to your post and are likely to encourage dialog and discussion
  • Do not overuse hashtags. The number of hashtags you use depends on which platform you are using, but in most cases, one or two hashtags work better than many.
  • The use of descriptive and unique hashtags can yield better results than widespread or generic ones.

Using hashtags is not a one-size-fits-all proposition that is the same for all social media. Here are a few ideas about how hashtags on specific social media platforms can be used properly.

Use Hashtags on Instagram

When it comes to Instagram, using more hashtags will lead to more engagement. Use up to 10 or 11 relevant and popular hashtags on this platform to get the most out of it. You probably do not need to use too many of them, but it is good to know that using more is good here, so you can experiment with what works for you.

Use the search box to see which hashtags are used by influencers or competition. Since this is the best forum for many hashtags, try various hashtags. For blogs, videos, and comments, use them.

Use Hashtags on Twitter

Using the appropriate Twitter hashtags will boost your participation. One or two hashtags on a tweet should be enough. If you use a few hashtags and explicitly ask your followers to retweet, this may result in more engagement.

Using Twitter hashtags can make your post available as people search for your tag. It can also help you locate conversations to get involved. To have even more effect on this forum, research hashtags are trending. Twitonomy is a good method specifically for studying Twitter patterns.

Use Hashtags of LinkedIN

On LinkedIn, people have not always stressed the use of hashtags, but they function on this site in the same way as any of the other social media sites. Using a couple of hashtags on your post if you are posting long-form material on LinkedIn. LinkedIn typically recommends one or three hashtags.

You can get your alerts outside of your network by using hashtags on LinkedIn. It is a perfect way to raise awareness about the brand.

The use of hashtags is an excellent tool for interacting with your followers as well as increasing interaction and attracting new target audiences. To be effective please keep in mind the social media platform you are using and best practices for best results.

Generation Z: the “Changemaker” Generation

By Ashleigh Horn

There’s no denying that each generation is different. Baby Boomers, Generation X, Xennials, Millennials, Generation Z, I’m sure as you read each of these titles, you may have recalled your own thoughts toward each group. During a time where as many as five different generations are working together in the workplace, it’s important to understand how they all function and what each brings to the table.

Though I could certainly cover all five of these and the impacts they have in the workplace, I want to instead provide first-hand insight into a generation that is seemingly misunderstood by its predecessors. This is a generation with a desire to create change; a generation that I have nearly 21 years of experience being part of. 

Who are we?

Although the lines defining the age range of my generation are a bit blurry, the Pew Research Center identifies this group as having been born after 1996 (Parker & Igielnik, 2020). Today, some Gen Z-ers walk the halls of middle schools, whereas others are hunched over books in their dorm rooms, working full-time agency jobs or even preparing to vote in the upcoming presidential election. There’s no doubt we’re all at different stages in our lives; however, somehow, some way, there are a few common desires and passions we all seem to share. 

How is this generation different?

Generation Z is the largest generation to date. We also have access to more technology, media and quite honestly, each other, than any generation before us. It may be our sheer size, or it quite simply may be the comfort we feel in sharing our thoughts and ideas through Instagram, YouTube and Snapchat, that compels us to reach for our dreams and to stand up for what we believe in. Politics, social injustice, sustainability, ideas for new products or businesses, we Gen Z-ers are a researched, opinionated, innovative, change-making group.

The Target Incubator

A few years back, the Target retail chain set out to better connect with this next generation of consumers. One way they did so, was through directly engaging with young Gen Z entrepreneurs in what they called the “Target Incubator.” Inspired by these young adults’ big ideas about “better for people” and “better for the planet” products, the company selected eight business pitches, created by students, to help become a reality.

You may be asking, “Why would the company do this, and what was their reward?”

Generation Z is often referred to as the “Changemaker” generation. Target recognized that many of its Gen Z consumers have big plans to change the world and sought to help make their dreams become reality. The students’ ideas ranged from producing compostable single-use products to using juice pulp waste to create healthy snacks. These eight businesses were not only unique—they did not simply provide innovative products or services—rather, they were all created as solutions to a number of the social and environmental issues we face in the 21st century.

I think James Sancto, founder of We Make Change, hit the nail on the head when he described Generation Z’s passion as “not willing to accept the world as it is, [who] believes [it] can address the challenges the world faces today, and [who] will do whatever [it] can to make the change [it wants] to see” (Sancto, 2019). The product of the Target Incubator is a testament to Gen Z’s eagerness and willingness to ensure the changes we wish to happen are made.

Our Values

Mission-Minded

Gen Z’s not so breakthrough solution to creating change is to have a purpose. Whether you’re a business, college institution, or just someone we pass on the street, Gen Z-ers want to know what you’re all about. 

What are your goals? 

Who or what do you stand for?

Does your vision align with what we believe? 

Generation Z prioritizes purpose and “[looks] to engage with brands and organizations that have a higher purpose that goes well beyond a simple transaction” (Beal, 2019). Unlike generations before us, we don’t simply purchase a product or rep a brand because we like it or it’s “convenient.” Rather, we use the power of reviews and our access to technology to compare prices, product availability, to research a company’s CSR practices and what it values, in order to make educated purchases (Salesfloor, n.d.).

Google, Netflix, Spotify and the Walt Disney Company are all examples of some of the most loved brands by Gen Z consumers. It’s no coincidence that all of these same companies placed in the Digital Marketing Institutes (2020) list of the “Top 16 Brands doing Corporate Social Responsibility Correctly.” Generation Z values these brands because they do more than provide their specific products and services; these companies use their platforms to create change on issues important to their employees and to each company as a whole.

Passion-Pursing

As I mentioned earlier, Gen Z-ers look for ways to impact our own corners of the world. In fact, we often make decisions with long-term consequences in mind. We’ve been called lazy, self-involved, tech-dependent, and more (The NPD Group, 2020). Yes, some of these monikers may be partly true. But, we are also a passionate generation focused on standing up for only those issues or movements that align with our interests. Our passions drive our actions. We just might change the world.

Takeaway

As each new year has passed onto the next, Generation Z, or the “Changemaker” generation, has become older and older. With this age has come new responsibilities, both in our own lives and in contributing to the world around us. We are growing up, entering the workforce and making an impact in our own generationally-unique way. Slowly but surely, we are revealing who we are, what we value, what our goals are, and are debunking the generational stereotypes that have defined us since we were babies. In turn, we are using these differences to provide new perspectives in both the workplace and in society, and are doing all in our power to create change.

Resources 

https://medium.com/we-make-change/we-are-the-changemaker-generation-7b6ae77b5f7f

https://www.pewsocialtrends.org/essay/on-the-cusp-of-adulthood-and-facing-an-uncertain-future-what-we-know-about-gen-z-so-far/

https://corporate.target.com/article/2018/10/target-incubator

https://corporate.target.com/article/2019/06/target-incubator-founders

https://www.npd.com/wps/portal/npd/us/news/tips-trends-takeaways/guide-to-gen-z-debunking-the-myths-of-our-youngest-generation/

https://digitalmarketinginstitute.com/blog/corporate-16-brands-doing-corporate-social-responsibility-successfully

https://prsay.prsa.org/2019/08/06/5-tips-to-effectively-engage-generation-zers/

The 4-Step Approach All PR Professionals Must Master

Written By: April Wood

Several guiding principles exist in the world of public relations. One message impressed upon students by professors and mentors in the industry that I strive to carry with me at all times is the statement, “Get the right message to the right audience at the right time and on the right platform.” Following this foundational statement can help you ensure that your efforts in executing tactics are not wasted. Let’s break it down together.

 

The Right Audience

I know this is not the first segment of the phrase, but I’m covering this segment first intentionally. Knowing your audience is of paramount importance. You cannot hope to know the right message, the right time, or the right platform without knowing to whom you are speaking. You must know your audience intimately, and this is not something that a public relations professional can afford to forget. Familiarize yourself with their beliefs, values, and interests. Learn who they are by building personas that can help you envision exactly to whom you are speaking. Furthermore, knowing your audience closely will give you nearly everything you need to know to reach them. 

 

The Right Message

If you know who your audience is, you know what they care about. If you can tap into this information, you can glean how to make them care about what you are saying. Craft your message with your audience in mind. Do not write something that sounds great to you, a city-dwelling millennial, when you are speaking to rural members of Generation X. Take the information you need to get across and translate it into terms that your audience can understand. A skilled communicator and writer can do this.  A message that is not properly crafted is a message that will be ignored. 

 

The Right Time

People are busy. You are a busy person too, I presume. People are full-time workers, or homemakers, or a combination of the two, or fill a million other roles. This is to say that your audience is not always listening. An enormous library of research has been conducted in order to discover when audiences are most reachable. It varies, of course, for each audience. Personally, I consume messages most devotedly at about 10 p.m. The same can not be said of my parents, who are most usually asleep by 9. Don’t waste your efforts by starting a conversation when no one is there to reply.

 

The Right Place

Let’s talk about my family again for a second. I am on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook. I do not watch cable (except when the Chiefs are playing). My parents, on the other hand, have no social media. They watch the news in the morning and evening. My dad listens to talk radio at work. This simple anecdote proves that not everyone collects their information from the same source. You cannot hope to reach your audience if you do not have a sense of where they engage. Just like research can inform you of “when” to reach your audience, research can also inform you of “where” to reach your audience. Familiarize yourself with the research surrounding your audience, or conduct your own if necessary.

 

Putting it Together

Everything I’ve covered ties directly back to one thing. I have relentlessly pounded this messaged in during the few hundred words preceding this: it all ties back to research. You cannot know anything about your audience if you do not take the time to learn about them. Nothing in public relations should be done thoughtlessly. Know your audience, know what they will listen to, know when they are listening, and know where they are listening and align this information and use it to communicate with them. 

 

IPR specialists learn that: Together, We’re Stronger

by Nikki Carpenter

The IPR team with Schnieders

The IPR team with Schnieders

For public relations students like myself, there is not an experience quite like Innovative Public Relations. To be honest, I did not know what I was getting into when I joined IPR. I had no idea what projects I would be assigned to, who would be on my team, and the skills I would quickly develop. The only thing I had to compare it to was a sports internship from over the summer.

In August, my team learned that we would be collaborating with the firm’s first off-campus client. Larry Schnieders, a retired corporate executive and UCM PR alumnus, wanted to share a story connecting two Kansas City high schools that have been housed at the same location. Both of the schools and their students prospered when all odds were against them.

The focus of our campaign is to utilize a crowdfunding platform to acquire the funds necessary for the shooting and editing of the film. As specialists with marginal knowledge of this unique fundraising technique, we found ourselves spending our time researching everything possible. From tips to statistics to looking at successful pages, we quickly developed a strategic approach in order to raise the necessary funds.

The Film

TWS trailer shoot

TWS trailer shoot

In partnership with Through A Glass Productions, “Together We’re Stronger” revisits the extraordinary story of Bishop Lillis High’s unexpected Missouri basketball state title in 1961. The team consisted of transfer students and a first-year coach. The film will have interviews of the players and coach of this team, who have gone on to be successful. One player was twice-elected mayor of Omaha, Nebraska. Another went on to win a gold medal at the Olympics.

The documentary will also follow Lillis’ legacy through the building’s current tenant, DeLaSalle Education Center. DeLaSalle is a charter school with alternative-style curriculum, and the only school of its kind in Missouri. DeLaSalle relies on donations and fundraisers to provide at-risk youth a personalized education to improve learning and life skills. The film is expected to bring a new audience to the school that has already reached its capacity of 300 students with a waiting list.

Getting Involved

The crowdfunding campaign to raise $18,000 will continue until Dec. 7 on Kickstarter. Check out the page here! For up-to-date information on everything regarding this project, make sure to like “Together We’re Stronger” on Facebook and follow the film on Twitter.

Be sure to like Innovative Public Relations on Facebook and follow us on Twitter and Instagram.

Pictures via Hank Young and Kali Schnieders