Category: Takeovers

Four Lessons Learned Practicing PR Abroad

By Amanda Ferrin

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Although you may not be considering working abroad, intercultural awareness is essential for anyone in the PR industry. Whether you’re interested in working in the corporate sector or a nonprofit, understanding the global market can greatly enhance your career.

This past summer, I had the opportunity to do my internship for a tourist company in Costa Rica. It was a terrifying experience that forced me to step out of my comfort zone. Here are some of the things I took away from it:

 

 

1. Knowing English is vital, but learning a second language is important

 

Considered to be the language of business and technology, English is the most spoken language of the 21st century. There are over 1.5 billion global speakers around the world! However, recent data from the United States Census Office suggests that the nation will have an estimated 138 million Spanish speakers by 2050, which would make it the largest Spanish-speaking nation.

Because our world is getting smaller and more diverse, many employers are looking for bilingual people to work in their PR/communication departments. Although you may not be able to travel abroad or take language classes, there are many free apps and websites, like Duolingo, available for practicing your language skills.

 

 

2. Successful communication isn’t always with words

 

Although I was translating marketing materials from Spanish, my actual Spanish-speaking abilities are limited. There were many instances where I had to use hand gestures to convey what I was trying to say. Smiling and showing confidence is key in those situations. Whether there is a language barrier or just a communication gap, stay aware of your non-verbals, which are vital in making a positive connection. This is especially important when you’re interviewing or meeting with clients.

 

 

3. Learn to look outside of your own cultural lens

 

When you are living in a certain location for a while, it’s easy to forget that not everyone is exposed to the same things as you. Your organization may be targeting a large demographic of people who have diverse interests. It’s vital to consider how things will be perceived by your audience.

Although we are taught everything in PR is deadline-driven, I found that to be less true in Costa Rica. Living by the phrase, “Pura Vida”, Costa Rican culture is laid back. The World Cup was going on during my internship and my co-workers actually stopped working to watch the game. If you ever partner with an international company, you may find yourself adjusting to different cultural norms.

 

 

4. Research, research, research

 

We are told to do this all the time as students, but it’s so important! I don’t know many people who use WhatsApp in the U.S., but it’s actually the most popular messaging solution in the world. Nearly 1 billion people are using it and everyone was using it in Costa Rica. Don’t assume that what’s popular at home is popular somewhere else. Do your research! You may have to utilize social media platforms you’ve never used or sell a product that’s not well-known in the U.S.

 

These are just a few of the lessons I learned during my internship. Whether you choose to stay in Missouri or move to the other side of the world, having intercultural awareness can give you the capacity to develop meaningful relationships with new, diverse audiences.

 

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The Social Media Plan and Its Cycle

By Jessica Gough

 

The Span of Social Media

It is no secret that social media is taking over the internet. In fact, over 77 percent of the U.S. population uses a social media profile regularly. That is 2.34 billion sets of eyes just waiting to be captivated. As a company, those eyes are extremely valuable to your success. So how do you attract them to your content?

 

What is a SMM Plan?

A social media marketing (SMM) plan allows an organization to detail what they would like to accomplish within the realm of social media. Along with these broad goals, a SMM plan also outlines what actions the organization will take in order to achieve these goals. A variety of benefits come from a social media marketing plan, so it is important to ensure your organization is taking advantage of this opportunity.

 

 

The SMM Planning Cycle

    It is important to understand that, like social media itself, SMM plans should continuously evolve. In order to maintain a successful plan, it is crucial that your SMM plan evolves with society. These nine steps will help guide you through creating your SMM plan.

  • Listening

What is your brand’s current social media presence?

 

  • Setting Goals

Analyze your organization using SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats) analysis. What realistic goals does your brand want to accomplish?

 

  • Defining Strategies

Use the “8 C’s of Strategy Development”. What strategies will help your brand reach its goals?

 

  • Identifying the target audience

What are the needs of your target audience?

 

  • Selecting Tools

What tools will work best for your strategies?

(hashtags, SEO, link shortening, images)

 

  • Selecting Platforms and Channels

What platforms will reach your target audience best?

 

  • Implementing

Put your plan into action!

 

  • Monitoring

Track you progress, and COLLECT DATA.

 

  • Tuning

This is a constant and continuous process.

 

Creating and monitoring a strong SMM plan will allow you to connect with various audiences in a familiar way. This connection can lead to numerous advantages for your organization.

 

Works Cited

https://www.statista.com/statistics/273476/percentage-of-us-population-with-a-social-network-profile/

https://defendernetwork.com/news/national/employers-relying-social-media/

https://getsocial4630.wordpress.com/2015/01/22/the-eight-cs-of-strategy-development/

An Unflinching Look at the Average Day of a College Student and PR Pro

By Jasmine Scott

Clipart picture of an exhausted and stressed businessman cartoon character

Image credit: iStock

Here’s a painfully honest peek into the life of a full-time college student, who also works remotely as a part time PR Professional for a non-profit organization.

 

7:15 a.m.: My alarm clock goes off.

I’d love to tell you that I hop out of bed with an abundance of energy and joy, but I said this would be honest. So, I hit snooze on my alarm clock…two more times.

7:30 a.m.: I roll out of bed and check my email.

I am subscribed to several news reporters, so this is my version of reading the newspaper. It’s very important to keep up with news in the PR world. PR is a quick moving industry and it’s important to keep up with what’s going on in your community as well as the world.

After I’m up to date, I brush my teeth and throw on a coat (it’s winter now). I make sure everything is in my backpack, grab a bottle of water out of my fridge, and make my way to my 8 am class.

7:55 a.m.: I sit down and pull out my notebook. I check my email until the professor starts his lecture and make a mental note of what I have to do this day. Spoiler alert: I have a lot to do.

8:50 a.m.: My only class of the day ends, and I make my way back to my apartment to get the second part of my day started: work.

9:00 a.m.:  I clock in and check my email. I usually only have about 10 unread emails in my inbox, some of which are just funny memes to put everyone in a good mood. I read through everything and update myself on any information I miss working remotely. I respond to the funniest memes first. After that, I email my boss and update him on my projects.

10 a.m.: I make a to-do list of everything I need to accomplish before I clock out. The list usually goes something like this:

  • Review recent Facebook posts
  • Schedule Facebook posts
  • Check email again
  • Scour through thousands of photos and stories sent to the company I work for
  • Check email again
  • Start blog draft
  • Plan out LinkedIn posts for the week
  • Check email again
  • Eat lunch at some point?

10:30 a.m.: It’s prime content creation time. I work for a non-profit company, so our posts are created to be ‘donor-centered’, which means that donors and investors are our target market.

I start creating new content by reviewing our Facebook posts. I see what posts our donors are interacting with and what posts are doing well or poor. Next, I look through our photobank for and start planning out posts in my head. After some creative thinking, I start creating posts. Finally, I schedule it and repeat the process.

1 p.m.: Did you hear that noise? Yeah, it was my stomach growling.

It’s time for lunch. So, I quickly make a sandwich (turkey and cheese with mustard, obviously) and continue working.

1:05 p.m.: I notice I have 4 unread emails since I last checked my inbox. I read through those and continue on with my day.

1:30 p.m.: Coffee.

After I eat my lunch, I tend to lose my focus. This is when I hit my mid-day slump and need to change my focus. I make a cup of coffee and switch my focus to the blog.

The first step of writing a good blog post is having a strong and compelling story to tell. Luckily, we keep track of the stories sent to us by our donors and partners. I read through the stories, sip my coffee, read through a couple more stories, and sip my coffee. I repeat this until one story particularly catches my eye. After picking a story, I start the first paragraph of the blog. I write it, pause, read it, erase the whole paragraph, and start again. Yes, this exactly how it goes almost every time. But I preserve and finish my draft. I email it to the writer I work with and wait for her edits.

4:30 p.m.: My boss randomly Facetimes me.

5:00 p.m.: I should clock-out, but I can’t. My to-do list isn’t complete.

The last thing I need to do for the day is plan out my LinkedIn posts for the week. This really depends on what’s going on for the week. Some weeks there is a huge event coming up, so I center my posts around that. Other weeks, I make posts based off what else is going on or even any amazing stories we have. I write down the posts I want to make this week and plan them out.

5:30 p.m.: After checking my email one last time, I clock out for the day.

5:31 p.m.: I open my fridge and make a snack. Probably a Hot-pocket.

6:15 – 8:30 p.m.: This is usually when I have meetings for different organizations.

9:00 p.m.: I’m tired, but my day isn’t over yet. In fact, it’s just beginning.

I open my agenda book and go over my schedule. I open my school email and see if my teachers have emailed me (they have). I respond. I open Blackboard to see if my teacher’s have put any grades in. I begin my homework.

I love being a PR major because my homework mostly consists of writing, creating content for mock clients, and preparing presentations. A PR Pro must be deadline driven, even in college. I don’t miss a deadline.

10:30 p.m.: Have I eaten today?

Yeah, I have. But I’m hungry again. I know you aren’t supposed to eat big meals before you go to bed but…it’s only 10:30 and I’m still doing homework. So, I usually eat. Most of the time it’s super healthy and definitely not a bag of chips.

10:31 p.m.: I open a bag of chips. Hey, I’m just doing what I can to make it to graduation.

11:30 p.m.: If at all possible, I try to give myself at least 30 minutes of relaxation before I go to bed. Sometimes I’m being productive until 2 am, but I try not to be.

I love working remotely because it’s helping me get one step closer to my goal of being a PR professional after I graduate, but it definitely takes focus and balance to get everything done. Every day is different. But it’s worth it.

How to Land Your First Job Before Graduation

By Emily Jarboe

Graduating college and venturing out into adulthood can be a rollercoaster of emotions. It’s terrifying, intimidating and exciting all at the same time. As if leaving college wasn’t scary enough, then there’s the pressure to secure that first job after graduation. Say goodbye to student discounts and hello to a 401K.

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Image credit: iStock

Most people plan to apply for jobs once they get out of school, but I made it a personal goal to land a full-time job before graduation. From teachers and career centers to job fairs and internships, there are so many resources to take advantage of that will no longer be available once I leave. Since I was so proactive in the job search process, I was able to land a job before graduation. Here’s how you can too:

 

Perfect Your Resume

Your resume is your big chance to catch a potential employer’s attention. This is where you can brag about your incredible work experience or highlight your summer internship. It’s a place to showcase your skills and all the hard work you put in during your time in college. I would recommend a clean, easy-to-read design that is tailored to fit your major. Be consistent with the spacing and choose an appropriate font. It’s also important to have several different people look at your resume to get a variety of feedback. Visit your college or university’s  Career Services Center where they can assist you in creating a resume that stands out from the crowd. Most importantly, keep updating your resume and continue to tailor it to every application.

Internships Are Key

An internship, whether during college or after, is a great way to gain real-world experience in your career field. It also can help you establish important relationships and connections with company professionals that can be very beneficial for your future career. The right internship can lead you to a full-time position, so choose wisely when searching for one. Personally, I believe that my internship gave me the opportunity to learn a lot about myself and pushed me to step out of my comfort zone. Plus, employers are much more likely to hire someone who has completed an internship rather than someone lacking real-work experience.

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Image credit: Snagajob.com

 

The Value in a Career Fair

There are so many benefits to taking the time to attend a career fair. One of the biggest benefits is the opportunity to network with potential employers. Many students believe it’s easier to find jobs online. While that might be true for some, I believe you have a better chance of landing the first interview when there is an opportunity to speak one-on-one with a company representative. I attended three different career fairs during my time in school, and each time provided me with the chance to practice interviewing. Approaching a potential employer can be intimidating, but by the third or fourth time I became comfortable and was able to make some valuable connections. Dress in professional attire, bring 20 copies of your resume, and take advantage of this free networking opportunity.

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Image credit: theblacksheeponline.com

 

Cultivate Relationships with Your Professors

I’ve always tried to keep good relationships with all of my teachers because you never know what kind of doors they can open for you. One of my professors helped me land a job interview that otherwise would not have been possible without her assistance. She recommended me for this position, which gave me a significant advantage over my competitors. I ended up receiving a job offer, and I wouldn’t be where I am in this process without the help of my teacher.

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Image credit: bestvalueschools.com

The most important takeaway from this post is to remember to trust the process and don’t get discouraged if you don’t receive a response right away. Good things take time and it’s important to be patient during the job hunt. I applied for several positions in the beginning and didn’t hear back from anyone until a week later. Take your time and enjoy the process. Don’t be tempted to take the first job offer you receive. It’s okay to be picky and wait for the position that is the right fit for you. Lastly, don’t neglect your LinkedIn account. Keeping up with LinkedIn can help you get noticed by future employers and recruiters.

Endless opportunities are waiting for you, so go out there and get them. Good luck and happy job hunting!

Four Creation Tips For Your Online Portfolio

By Nickey Buzek

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“Can I see some of your work?” You may have a wealth of experience and the skills to back it up, but if your abilities aren’t coming across in an easy-to-access fashion, you may be missing professional opportunities. Here are four tips that will make your online portfolio showcase your skills:

  1. Choose the right platform – There are a multitude of providers dedicated to helping you build a website. Some of them include Wix, Squarespace, and web.com. You’ll want to do your research and make sure their platform aligns with your portfolio goals. If your public relations skills are focused on design, for example, you’ll want to choose a platform that lets you be more creative with visuals. If your skills lean more toward the written aspect of PR, you’ll want a platform that showcases verbiage.
  2. Choose a design – While each of the providers mentioned above will give you suggestions on funky templates, there are two basic designs that are proven to enhance user experience (UX). The F pattern is used for websites with large amounts of content. Wikipedia is an excellent example. Notice that important headers are on the left and description information flows to the right.
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    Image credit: wikipedia.org

    This makes it easier for the user to locate information and understand the organization of the page. The Z pattern, however, is the pattern you’ve probably seen most often. It uses four main spaces for important information: the top left, top right, middle, bottom left and bottom right. This pattern is used so often that internet surfers are quickly frustrated when they can’t find important information in its “natural spot.” Using the Z pattern will cater to user’s natural search.

  3. Showcase your skills – While your portfolio is a reflection of you as a person, the purpose of the website is to showcase your skills. Refrain from making your homepage a giant picture of your face with a bio attached. Chances are, if someone’s already on your portfolio website, they’ve already met you. Have your homepage showcase the different areas your skills cover. Include clickable images or links that take them to more in-depth examples and explanations.
  4. Create a visual guide – The aesthetics of your website act as the user’s road map. Manipulating content size, color, groupings, and contrast will help the user understand what content you want them to look at first. 123222221223223Large items and bright colors will be seen first, and items grouped together help the user see what items go with one another. When creating your visual guide, it’s helpful to have someone look at it who has a third-party view. How they navigate your website will more than likely be how others navigate your website.

 

Designing a portfolio that’s easy to use, aesthetically pleasing, and easy to navigate is a daunting task when you’re just trying to meet the needs of people asking to look at your work. Just remember, your portfolio is meant to showcase your skills in an easy-to-navigate fashion. These four tips can start you on the path to success, but don’t hesitate to take a deeper dive into the world of website design!

Crockpot Controversy Crisis

By Emily Thole

*Warning. This post may contain spoilers about the hit TV show, “This is Us.” Proceed with caution.*

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Image credit: NBC.com

 

“This is Us” is the television show everyone is telling you to watch. It is full of happiness, anger, sadness, joy and every emotion in between, however, there is one monumental episode that you can’t forget. If you’re anything like me, this blog post will bring up a flood of emotions, so get your tissues ready.

As avid viewers of the show, we all know where we were when Jack died. Yes, I’m bringing up that heartbreaking moment. I was sitting with my roommates on our red leather couch in the living room, staring at the small screen with tears rolling down our faces, full of disbelief. This man fearlessly saved his entire family from a house fire, and then went back into the blazing building to rescue his daughter’s dog and a few personal items, only to wind up valiantly perishing. He was a hero, and then he was gone. Not because of burns, or an injury that was visible, but for having too much smoke in his lungs. This is the drama that keeps viewers coming back.

What does this tragic scene have to do with public relations? Well, after the episode, fans were boycotting one particular brand, and because of that, they had a crisis on their hands.

One thing I didn’t mention was how the fire started in the Pearson household. It was a Crock-Pot. The faulty slow cooker is accidentally left on and it starts a fire in the family’s kitchen, which leads to the entire house burning down, and later, Jack’s demise. Fans of the show immediately took to the Internet to share their heartbreak and frustration over the episode and the Crock-Pot brand. Their name was disgraced, and their stock plummeted, but Crock-Pot’s response to the crisis is one PR professionals can learn from.

 

Quick Response

First, Crock-Pot responded quickly. They released a statement less than 24-hours after the show aired. And shortly after they sent out a news release stating facts about their products to ease consumers’ minds that can be read fully here. Not only that, but they created a Twitter page called “CrockPotCares” to respond to viewers who were concerned about product safety, and throwing away their Crock-Pots.

 

Empathy

Crock-Pot did a great job of listening to consumers’ complaints. They understood that people were upset, and they did their best to respond with understanding to build back their image. They even created the hashtag #CrockPotIsInnocent to use in their responses to defend their brand.

Good tweet to consumer https://twitter.com/CrockPotCares/status/956258200239706114

Free crockpot https://twitter.com/CrockPotCares/status/956278840103448577

 

Help from Star Power

Although this was a crisis they didn’t see coming, Crock-Pot wasn’t afraid to ask for help when getting their image back. They used the actor who portrays Jack, Milo Ventimiglia, in a commercial promoting the Super Bowl, joking about the Crock-Pot controversy. “The Late Show” host, Stephen Colbert, mentioned the issue on his show, stirring up conversation. Ellen DeGeneres even partnered with the company to hand out Crock-Pots as one of the giveaways on her show. Each of these people helped Crock-Pot restore their image.

A crisis can pop up at any time. Companies must be prepared in case a television show uses your product to kill off a beloved character. In a time of crisis, PR professionals can use Crock-Pot as an example. Although the situation presented on screen was fictional, Crock-Pot responded successfully and recovered quickly because of the crisis plan they had in place.

 

Crockpot even got Jack (Milo Ventimiglia) to make a video joking about the crisis as a whole (https://twitter.com/CrockPotCares/status/959789384785715200)

SUPER BOWL

Their own hashtag #CrockPotIsInnocent

Ellen https://twitter.com/CrockPotCares/status/961722927833067521

Stephen cobert https://twitter.com/CrockPotCares/status/958022381741764609

Good tweet to consumer https://twitter.com/CrockPotCares/status/956258200239706114

Free crockpot https://twitter.com/CrockPotCares/status/956278840103448577

Three Social Media Trends You’re Nearly Guaranteed to See

By Emily Jarboe

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Image credit: Know Techie

Have you ever thought about what social media will look like in the next 10 years? Social media and its strategies are constantly changing. Consider just how much social media has evolved in the last five years. Companies need to keep up with change in trends and progression of technology in order to stay current and connect with their audience.

While it can be difficult to predict the future of social media marketing, there are at least three trends that experts say can be anticipated:

Consumption of visual content will change

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Image credit: Social Report

As a public relations professional or a social media marketer, you should know how important it is to include visual content into your social media marketing plan. If you have not shifted your attention to visual content, then you are in need of a new marketing strategy because this particular trend should not be ignored.

Here are some statistics I found that justify the statements above:

  • “When people read information, they’re likely to remember only 10% of that information three days later. However, if a video presents that same information, people retained 70% of the information three days later.”
  • “Video content currently represents more than 70% of all internet traffic.”
  • “Facebook users watch 8 billion videos per day.”
  • 4X as many consumers would prefer to watch a video about a product than to read about it.”

 

The Rise of Dark Social

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Image credit: amazeemetrics.com

According to Techopedia, Dark Social refers to “the social sharing of content that occurs outside of what can be measured by web analytics programs.” Dark Social can be a challenge for companies that are trying to track and monitor social media activity and website referrals.  Dark Social mostly occurs when a link is sent through email or instant messaging, instead of shared on a social media platform where results can be easily measured.

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Image credit: talkwalker.com

The Death of Organic Reach and Facebook

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Image credit: mbbagency.com

Facebook is making it very hard to reach your audience organically. Facebook originated with the initial idea to help people connect with each other. Due to users complaining that posts from the media, businesses, and brands have “crowded out their personal moments,” Facebook decided to be very cautious and selective about what they place on their users’ feeds. Looking towards the future, brands may want to shift their Facebook strategy entirely to a paid approach since the luxury of a free online presence is declining.

While the future of social media marketing can’t always be easily forecasted, we can almost guarantee that the trends are likely to change as technology progresses. Our social media strategies and how we approach them are constantly evolving, and it’s especially important to keep up with those changes in order to successfully connect with our audience and stay relevant.

Starting with Why: Public Relations in Action

By Meredith Trapper

As a student, I often find myself relating activities or hobbies to the things I am learning in class. However, this year I was able to do the opposite and take what I have learned in the classroom and apply it to my executive position in Delta Zeta sorority.

This past year I served as the vice president of membership for Delta Zeta. In this role, my main purpose was to prepare our current members for fall recruitment. Training for recruitment can begin as early as January and include a number of workshops.

Being a young PR professional, I started to ask myself some questions. Why am I doing this? Why do I need to train my members? Why do we do recruitment? In doing this, I was reminded of the book we read in Orientation to PR, ‘Start with Why.’ In this book, we looked at the importance of knowing your “why” in all aspects of life. I took this very simple lesson and applied it to our first training session. I found a TED talk about the book and a poem that got our members to reflect on the questions I had been asking myself. By doing this, members were able to find the purpose of our activities and stay motivated for all recruitment workshops.

 

The next training session, I applied yet another classroom lesson. We completed a SWOT analysis (strength, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats) of our sorority. We also discussed who our target audience would be during recruitment. We looked at ourselves internally and then discussed the types of women we wanted in the future. This helped us strategize on how to engage this type of women we were searching for.

Spring semester is also a good time to look at our “brand” and what we want that to look like to those outside of the organization. We pride ourselves in being a group of intelligent, diverse women who empower one another, but how do we show that? We took to social media to try to reflect this. We took an old idea of a hashtag and ran with it. #TakeoverTuesday was used in the weeks leading up to recruitment to show ways that our women had empowered one another.

 

If you want to empower your brand, “start with your why” and build from your answer. You might be shocked what you learned about yourself and your organization.

 

Innovative PR wins professional awards for #teamUCM Social Media Night

By Blake Hedberg

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WARRENSBURG, Mo. (Aug. 27, 2018) — The University of Central Missouri’s student-led public relations firm, Innovative PR, received two professional awards this summer for its 2017 event #teamUCM Social Media Night. The agency competed against many for-profit businesses in the Greater Kansas City Area.

The Kansas City chapter of the International Association of Business Communicators (IABC) awarded #teamUCM Social Media Night a KC Quill award, the second time in the firm’s history to receive this honor. However, the winning wasn’t over for Innovative PR for the summer. In July, the firm received a Silver AMPS award from the Social Media Club of Kansas City at the organization’s annual banquet.

“We are incredibly honored to be distinguished for our work. Many hours went into making this event a reality and it is a great feeling to see the work of our students pay off,” said Agency Manager Blake Hedberg. “The 2017 event pushed our agency to new heights and created many opportunities, while providing visibility to our firm. I had a great team behind me.”

For six consecutive years, Innovative PR has been the driving force behind UCM’s popular #teamUCM Social Media Night event. Launched in 2013, the event takes place during a UCM Mules and Jennies basketball game and has engaged, entertained, and rewarded participants with a night of prizes, trivia, and contests.

The spring 2017 Innovative PR team raised more than $2,000 in donations and their comprehensive social media plan ushered in more than 1.2 million media impressions. IPR and UCM Athletics social media impressions more than tripled, while mentions increased more than 40 percent and profile visits nearly tripled over 2016 event numbers.

“Innovative PR’s work on behalf of its many clients is excellent. Winning the 2018 awards is an illustration of that excellence,” said program supervisor Dr. Tricia Hansen Horn. “We are proud to have the agency’s work represented and recognized by the Kansas City IABC and the Social Media Club of Kansas City.”

For more than nine years, students in the UCM Public Relations Program that are accepted into the UCM Innovative PR agency have the opportunity to gain real-life experience, while working with several client projects. In its time, more than 100 students have dedicated more than 22,000 hours of service to the greater UCM community.

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Innovative Public Relations (Innovative PR) is University of Central Missouri’s student public relations firm, managed and operated by UCM public relations students. Under the direction of UCM’s Integrated Marketing and Communications office and the academic public relations program, the firm was founded in January 2010. It is comprised of several public relations students who are dedicated to professional development and public relations initiatives. Innovative PR is committed to serving the UCM community by executing timely, accurate and ethical strategies and tactics, with a goal of serving clients outside of the UCM community in the future. For more information, visit ucminnovativepr.com or contact Innovative PR at ipr@ucmo.edu or 660-543-8557.

How YouTubers Have Changed the Game for Public Relations

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Image credit: Youtube.com

By Sarah Schroll

Each day, 1.5 billion viewers watch an hour or more of videos on YouTube. Over the last five years, YouTube has increased its viewership ten-fold and the different kinds of content has expanded. Because of this, companies are contacting popular YouTubers to showcase and promote their products as social media influencer relations has increased in importance. Below are a few ways that YouTubers have changed the game for public relations.

 

  1. PR Haul Videos

A trend with more popular YouTubers is having videos where the YouTuber strictly opens products that were sent to them from companies. With many of these videos reaching a million or more views, companies are seeing the value of sending an item to a YouTuber with the channel content in mind. This gives the company the potential of not only getting screen time for their products but also gives that YouTuber the opportunity to make a future video using their product.

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Image credit: Youtube.com

 

  1. Trying products sent from companies in a video

Many companies have found it beneficial to send new products to YouTubers because it gives them visibility and credibility that advertisements and paid sponsorships do not. In the PR Haul video that is pictured above, YouTuber Tati opens a product that was sent to her by L’Oreal Cosmetics and says “I think I need to do a video on this actually, not sponsored, just sent to me.” Two weeks after the haul video was posted, Tati made a video using the product.

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Image credit: Youtube.com

 

  1. First Impressions, Favorites and Haul Videos

These are videos that have little to no sponsorship attached. This style of video gives the impression that the YouTuber is providing their honest opinion of the product. If this product is liked by the YouTuber, it can be a powerful component in the consumer’s decision to buy. This is a doubled–edged sword, however, because many YouTubers will discuss products that they didn’t care for as well.

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Image credit: Youtube.com

 

  1. Sponsorships

One of the oldest ways that companies have showcased their products on YouTube is through sponsorships. This could be showcasing products in a video and having a link to the product in the description or simply stating that the video is sponsored in the title. Sponsorships are mutually beneficial to both parties as both receive revenue from the collaboration. The content of these videos tend to have more of an advertisement feel and some people may not find it appealing.

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Image credit: Youtube.com

 

What are some ways that you have seen a product being promoted on YouTube? Did we miss anything? Let us know in the comments below, and check us out on Facebook and Twitter.